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Celt

Celt (kĕlt, sĕlt) or Kelt (kĕlt). 1 One who speaks a Celtic language or who derives ancestry from an area where a Celtic language was spoken; i.e., one from Ireland, the Scottish Hebrides and Highlands, the Isle of Man, Wales, Cornwall, or Brittany. 2 A member of a group of peoples first found in SW Germany and E France early in the 2d millennium BC, but perhaps much older than that. The Celts were a group of tribes speaking Indo-European dialects. Armed with iron weapons and mounted on horses, they spread rapidly over Europe, crossing into the British Isles, moving S over France, Italy, and Spain, fighting the Macedonians, and penetrating into Asia Minor, where they raided Hellenistic centers. The Celts introduced the newly developed iron industries. Their wealth from trade and from raiding helped to maintain their dominance over Central Europe during the Iron Age. The La Tène culture developed among the Celts. Greek influences that stimulated Celtic culture included the introduction of the chariot and of writing. Art flourished in richly ornamented styles. The Celts lived in semifortified villages, with a tribal organization that became increasingly hierarchical as wealth was acquired. Priests, nobles, artisans, and peasants were clearly distinguished, and the powers of the chief became kinglike. The Celts believed in a demonic universe and relied on the ministry of the druids. Much Western European folklore is derived from the Celts. By the 4th cent. BC they could no longer withstand the encroaching Germanic tribes, and they lost most of their holdings in the north and in W Germany. From that time on, Celtic history becomes confused with that of the many unsettled tribes in Europe. Celtic language and culture were variously dispersed among peoples of little historical identity, and until the 20th cent. historians obscured the very important differences among these groups by naming them all Celts. Further confusion has resulted from the designation of the Celts as a racial group. To the Greeks and Romans, the Celts were tall, muscular, and light-skinned, but it is believed that these were qualities of the Celt warriors rather than Celts in general. The term Celtic is actually a cultural one, unrelated to physical heredity. It implies a cultural tradition maintained through many centuries of common history in the same general area. See also Iron Age.

See N. Chadwick, The Celts (1970); D. Adam, The Edge of Glory: Prayers in the Celtic Tradition (1988); A. McBain, Celtic Mythology and Religions (1988).

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Celt

Celt a member of a group of peoples inhabiting much of Europe and Asia Minor in pre-Roman times. Their culture developed in the late Bronze Age around the upper Danube, and reached its height in the La Tène culture (5th to 1st centuries bc) before being overrun by the Romans and various Germanic peoples. The language group of the Celts is Celtic, constituting a branch of the Indo-European family and including Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Welsh, Breton, Manx, Cornish, and several extinct pre-Roman languages such as Gaulish.
Celtic Church the Christian Church in the British Isles from its foundation in the 2nd or 3rd century until its assimilation into the Roman Catholic Church (664 in England; 12th century in Wales, Scotland, and Ireland).
Celtic cross a Latin cross with a circle round the centre.
Celtic fringe the Highland Scots, Irish, Welsh, and Cornish in relation to the rest of Britain; the term, often regarded as derogatory, is recorded from the late 19th century.
Celtic tiger the Irish economy seen as a successor to the earlier tiger economies.
Celtic twilight the romantic fairy tale atmosphere of Irish folklore and literature; the term derives originally from W. B. Yeats's name for his collection of writings (1893) based on Irish folk-tales.

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"Celt." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Celt

Celt Someone who speaks one of the Celtic languages or is descended from a Celtic language area. After 2000 bc, early Celts spread from e France and w Germany over much of w Europe, including Britain. They developed a village-based, heirarchical society headed by nobles and Druids. Conquered by the Romans, the Celts were pushed into Ireland, Wales, Cornwall, and Brittany by Germanic peoples. Their culture remained vigorous, and Celtic churches were important in the early spread of Christianity in n Europe.

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Celt

Celt / kelt; selt/ • n. a member of a group of peoples inhabiting much of Europe and Asia Minor in pre-Roman times. Their culture developed in the late Bronze Age and reached its height in the 5th to 1st centuries bc before being overrun by the Romans and various Germanic peoples. ∎  a native of any of the modern nations or regions in which Celtic languages are (or were until recently) spoken; a person of Irish, Highland Scottish, Manx, Welsh, or Cornish descent.

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"Celt." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Celt

Celt, Kelt †a Gaul XVII; one who speaks a Celtic language XVIII. In the earliest use — L. Celtæ pl. — Gr. Keltoí; in the mod. use — F. Celte.
So Celtic XVII. — L. Celticus and F. celtique.

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"Celt." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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celt

celt prehistoric instrument with chisel edge. XVIII. — modL. celtes, based on celte, which occurs in the Clementine text of Vulg., Job 19: 24 (‘stylo ferreo et plumbi lamina vel celte sculpantur in silice’), where some MSS. read certe ‘surely’ (corr. to ‘for ever’ of A. V.); the adoption of the word as a techn. term of archaeology was prob. assisted by a supposed connection with Celt.

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celt

celt / selt/ • n. Archaeol. a prehistoric stone or metal implement with a beveled cutting edge, probably used as a tool or weapon.

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Celt

Celt •gestalt • asphalt •belt, Celt, dealt, dwelt, felt, gelt, knelt, melt, misdealt, pelt, Scheldt, smelt, spelt, svelte, veld, welt •fan belt • seat belt • lifebelt • sunbelt •rust belt • Copperbelt • heartfelt •underfelt • backveld • bushveld •Roosevelt •atilt, built, gilt, guilt, hilt, jilt, kilt, lilt, quilt, silt, spilt, stilt, tilt, upbuilt, wilt •Vanderbilt • volte •assault, Balt, exalt, fault, halt, malt, salt, smalt, vault •cobalt • stringhalt • basalt •somersault • polevault •bolt, colt, dolt, holt, jolt, moult (US molt), poult, smolt, volt •deadbolt • Humboldt • thunderbolt •megavolt • spoilt • Iseult •consult, cult, exult, indult, insult, penult, result, ult •adult • occult • tumult • catapult •difficult • Hasselt

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