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Marcellus

Marcellus (märsĕl´əs), principal plebeian family of the ancient Roman gens Claudia. Marcus Claudius Marcellus, c.268–208 BC, was consul five times. In his first consulship he fought (222) against the Insubrian Gauls and killed their king in single combat. In his third consulship he was a colleague of Fabius Maximus, and he went (214) into S Italy and Sicily to prosecute the Second Punic War. He besieged Syracuse and took (212) the city, in spite of the ingenious defenses made by Archimedes. In his fifth consulship he fell in a skirmish with Hannibal's men near Venusia. Plutarch wrote a biography of him. Marcus Claudius Marcellus, d. 45 BC, was a friend of Cicero and subject of the Ciceronian oration, Pro Marcello. He held the posts of curule aedile (56 BC) and consul (51 BC). As a senatorial partisan Marcellus defended Milo against Clodius and joined the opponents of Julius Caesar in the civil war. Caesar pardoned him after Pharsalus. Marcus Claudius Marcellus, 42 BC–23 BC, was son of Octavia, sister of Augustus, who greatly favored him. Marcellus was considered to be Augustus' intended heir; he was adopted as son of the emperor, married to Julia, the emperor's daughter, and made pontifex. He died at Baiae, and Augustus named a theater for him.

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"Marcellus." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/marcellus

Marcellus of Ancyra

Marcellus of Ancyra (märsĕl´əs, ănsī´rə), fl. 350, Galatian churchman, the most violent opponent of Arianism in Asia Minor. He developed the theory that the Trinity was the result of emanations from God that would ultimately revert to God in the final judgment. Marcellus practically denied all distinction between Father and Son, thus teaching a virtual Sabellianism (see Sabellius) that proved embarrassing to his orthodox defenders. His views were eventually condemned.

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"Marcellus of Ancyra." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Marcellus of Ancyra." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/marcellus-ancyra

"Marcellus of Ancyra." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/marcellus-ancyra