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Ahvaz

AHVAZ

Capital of the province of Khuzistan in southwestern Iran.

Located on the Karun River, Ahvaz developed as a flourishing pre-Islamic city, and it became the capital of the province of Khuzistan in the late tenth century. Its silk textile and sugar production were very important. Ahvaz declined after the Mongol invasions. By the nineteenth century it had dwindled to a small town. But the opening of the Karun River in 1888 to international navigation, the beginning of oil exploration in 1908 at nearby Masjed Suleyman, and the construction of the Trans-Iranian railroad, which reached Ahvaz in 1929, all stimulated the growth of the city. By the 1950s the population of Ahvaz had reached more than 100,000. The primary causes of growth during this period were commerce and port activity. Beginning in the 1960s and continuing throughout and after the IranIraq War (19801988), Ahvaz developed as a major industrial center. The population was 804,980 in the 1996 census.

see also iran.

Parvaneh Pourshariati

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"Ahvaz." Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East and North Africa. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Ahvaz." Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East and North Africa. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/ahvaz

"Ahvaz." Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East and North Africa. . Retrieved October 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/ahvaz

Ahvaz

Ahvaz or Ahwaz (both: äwäz´), city (1991 pop. 724,653), SW Iran, on the Karun River. It is an oil center, a transportation hub, and an industrial city that has petrochemical, textile, and food-processing industries. An ancient city, Ahvaz was rebuilt (3d cent. AD) by Ardashir I, who named it Hormuzd-Ardashir. In the 4th cent. Ahvaz became the seat of a bishopric, and a large church was built there. It was an important Arab trading center in the 12th and 13th cent. but later declined. The discovery of oil nearby in the early 20th cent. restored the city to its former importance. The new part of Ahvaz, the administrative and industrial center, is on the right bank of the Karun, but the population still is concentrated in the old section on the left bank. Ahvaz is linked by road, rail, and oil pipeline to ports on the Persian Gulf.

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"Ahvaz." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Ahvaz." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/ahvaz

"Ahvaz." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved October 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/ahvaz