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League

League or Holy League, in French history, organization of Roman Catholics, aimed at the suppression of Protestantism and Protestant political influence in France. It was foreshadowed as early as 1561 by the formation of the triumvirate of Anne, duc de Montmorency; François, 2d duc de Guise (see under Guise, family); and Marshal Saint-André. After the outbreak of the Wars of Religion (see Religion, Wars of), local and provincial leagues were formed. Finally, when the Protestants, or Huguenots, won unprecedented concessions at the Peace of Monsieur (1576), a declaration calling for a national League of Catholics was issued by Henri, 3d duc de Guise. King Henry III, fearing the ambitious Guise, proclaimed himself its head. A Huguenot uprising soon followed. After a successful campaign that enabled him to withdraw some of his previous concessions to the Huguenots, Henry III dissolved (1577) the League. It was revived in 1585, soon after the Protestant Henry of Navarre (later King Henry IV) had become the heir presumptive to the throne. Having taken up arms, Guise forced the king (July, 1585) to issue an edict for the conversion or exile of Protestants and the exclusion of Henry of Navarre from the succession. In the war that followed (the War of the Three Henrys), the League and the king were technically allied, but the League assumed the right to dictate, forcing the king to leave Paris (1588) and to renew his previous concessions. This dictation led Henry to order the assassination of Henri de Guise, who was succeeded at the head of the League by his brother Charles, duc de Mayenne. After the accession (1589) of Henry IV, the League controlled all the large cities, including Paris, and had the active support of Philip II of Spain, who sent Alessandro Farnese to Mayenne's aid. It split into two factions, however, over the question of Spanish interference, and it was weakened by Henry's military successes. Henry's victory at Ivry (1590), his abjuration of Protestantism (1593), and his entry into Paris (1594) brought the League's organized resistance to an end, and by 1598 the last important League member had submitted to Henry. For the Holy League in Italian history, see Holy League.

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"League." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"League." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved November 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/league

league

league1 / lēg/ • n. 1. a collection of people, countries, or groups that combine for a particular purpose, typically mutual protection or cooperation: the League of Nations. ∎  an agreement to combine in this way. 2. a group of sports clubs that play each other over a period for a championship. ∎  the contest for the championship of such a league: the year we won the league. 3. a class or category of quality or excellence: the two men were not in the same league Jack’s in a league of his own. • v. (leagues , leagued , lea·guing ) [intr.] join in a league or alliance: Oscar had leagued with other construction firms. PHRASES: in league conspiring with another or others: he is in league with the devil. league2 • n. a former measure of distance by land, usually about three miles.

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"league." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"league." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/league-0

"league." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved November 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/league-0

league

league2 covenant for mutual assistance. XV. Early forms (ligg, ligue, leag(u)e, lege) show deriv. (i) partly from F. ligue—It liga, latinized form of lega, f. legare bind :- L. ligāre; (ii) partly immed. from It. lega.
Hence vb. XVII. leaguer1 member of a league, XVI; see -ER1.

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"league." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"league." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/league-2

"league." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved November 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/league-2

league

league1 distance of three miles. XIV. The earliest forms show two types, leuge and leghe, the first — late L. leuca, leuga, late Gr. leúgē (of Gaul. orig.), the second— Pr. lega, whence (O)F. lieue; the second type has survived.

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League

League

a group of persons, states, or other organizations with a common interest.

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"League." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"League." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Retrieved November 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/league

league

leaguefatigue, Grieg, intrigue, league, renege •colleague •Blitzkrieg, Sitzkrieg

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"league." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"league." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved November 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/league